Span Blackheath 20th Century Society Tour

I recently attended another 20th Century Society architectural tour, this time an almost ludicrously comprehensive perambulation of Span developments in Blackheath. The four-and-a-half hour tour took in the full range of Span housing types, of which there was a unexpectedly wide variety.

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The Priory (1956)

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The Priory (1956)

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Spangate (1964)

The Priory (1956), The Hall (1957), Spangate (1964) and Hallgate (1958) were examples of classic Eric Lyons-designed low-rise 1950s and 1960s apartment blocks, containing apartments filled with light (thanks to extensive glazing to the front and rear of each apartment) and looking/opening out onto perfectly maintained landscaped gardens.

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The Hall (1957)

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The Hall (1957)

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The Hall (1957), detail

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Hallgate (1958)

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Hallgate (1958), detail

I’ve previously been to view an apartment in Hallgate and while I admired the setting and the development (particularly the glazed open porches and that unusual sculpture), I wasn’t overly taken with the flat itself due to the slightly tired decor inside. 

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The Priory (1956), interior of first floor apartment

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The Priory (1956), interior of first floor apartment

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The Priory (1956), interior of first floor apartment

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The Priory (1956), interior of first floor apartment

The two sympathetically modernised apartments that we given access to as part of this tour (one in The Priory and the other in The Hall) were far better examples, showcasing the features of these bright spaces to their full potential.

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The Hall (1957), interior of ground floor apartment

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The Hall (1957), interior of ground floor apartment

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The Hall (1957), interior of ground floor apartment

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The Hall (1957), interior of ground floor apartment

We were also shown around some classic 1950s and 1960s Eric Lyons developments made up of two-storey terraced houses, including The Lane (1964),  The Keep (1957), Hall II (1958), Corner Green (1959) and The Plantation (1962). Like the apartments in his apartment blocks, Lyons’ houses were designed to maximise the qualities of light and space and to enhance the relationship between the buildings and the surrounding landscape. Care was taken to design and build houses around existing mature trees, supplemented with new planting and the creation of communal areas that encouraged residents to mix.

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Hall II (1958)

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Hall II (1958)

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Hall II (1958)

Some of the developments stood out as being particularly successful (for me, The Plantation and Corner Green, the latter of which was reportedly Eric Lyons’ favourite), due to their design and colour schemes coupled with the positioning of the houses around a large central open grassy space set back from the road.

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The Plantation (1962)

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The Plantation (1962)

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Corner Green (1959)

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Corner Green (1959)

Other developments, whilst equally well designed, felt slightly compromised by the size, shape and/or condition of the sites upon which they were built (the houses on The Lane, for instance, were built around a snaking tarmac drive whilst the grass and vegetation in The Keep looked like it could do with being watered in places).

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The Lane (1964)

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The Keep (1957)

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The Keep (1957)

There were some interesting outliers along the way. The Foxes Dale Houses (1957) were a trio of larger townhouses, unusually set over three storeys with a striking spiral staircase at their centre.

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Foxes Dale House (1957), exterior and back (photo from House & Garden)

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Foxes Dale House (1957), interior views (photos from House & Garden)

These houses had both paved gardens to the front and rear and a balcony screened by glass and roofed by a pergola on the first floor. House & Garden were enlisted at the time to decorate these houses in seemingly flamboyant mid century style, judging by these images from the publication at the time.  

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Foxes Dale House (1957), interior views (photos from House & Garden)

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Foxes Dale House (1957), interior views (photos from House & Garden)

Designed with a more affluent customer in mind (House & Garden referred to an imaginary retired Royal Navy commander working at Greenwich, aged about 40, married, with a son of ten), the developers apparently had a tough time shifting these houses as they were too expensive for the area at the time, which seemed to put the developers off from building any further premium housing of this type in the area.

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Foxes Dale House (1957), exterior and interior views (photos from House & Garden)

Southrow (1963) also had a slightly different look and feel.

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Southrow (1963)

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Southrow (1963)

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Southrow (1963), view from roof terrace

This development, comprised of 10 two-storey maisonettes and 23 apartments set around a large rectangular quad with one side of the development and the communal roof terrace looking out onto the heath, was also seemingly built with a more affluent customer in mind.

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Southrow (1963), communal areas

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Southrow (1963), roof terrace

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Southrow (1963), communal areas

The houses, one of which we were given access into, originally contained a pointlessly large upstairs landing area, which the owner of this house had sensibly converted into a third bedroom and the flats, one of which we also saw inside, were extremely generously sized and quadruple aspect, with striking views from every window.

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Southrow (1963), interior of Type Q maisonette

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Southrow (1963), interior of Type Q maisonette

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Southrow (1963), interior of second floor apartment

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Southrow (1963), interior of second floor apartment

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Southrow (1963), interior of second floor apartment

The 13 sand coloured terraced houses on Hall IV (1967) were another outlier. These houses had a decidedly brutalist aesthetic not seen in any other of Eric Lyons’ estates in Blackheath.

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Hall IV ((1967)

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Hall IV ((1967)

The tour also took us to some post-Eric Lyons Span oddities from the late 1970s and 1980s, including Streetfield Mews (1984), Corner Keep (1979) and Birchmere (1982).

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Corner Keep (1979)

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Streetfield Mews (1984)

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Birchmere (1982)

While the use of materials and certain design choices (a weird faux Medieval typeface on the signs, red-brown Brookside-style brick, circular windows) on these estates were typical of the era, other features (seclusion from the road, immaculate landscaping and extensive glazing) were classic Span.

Note: I am certainly no Span expert so may have mis-identified any number of estates pictured above – let me know if you spot any and I will amend accordingly! 

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